Being Present

 

Credit: Pinterest

Last week I came across the above quote and it really spoke to me. Being physically present and being mentally present have two completely different definitions. Lately I have been feeling the absence of deep, meaningful conversations in my life and I yearn for that void to be filled.

I cannot remember the last time a phone wasn’t pulled out at some point during a conversation. When hanging out with a group of friends all it takes is one person to pick up their phone and everyone feels obligated to check theirs too. We have grown accustomed to the presence of technology and it is getting harder and harder to be fully present in day to day life. The truth about technology is saddening because no one my age knows how to entertain themselves without a screen. Someone whip out Yahtzee or Pictionary, PLEASE.

It may seem ridiculous to live without technology but pulling back from constant screen use is a great way to slow down your brain. Lock your phone and instead pass some time by reading, journaling or drawing…unleash the creativity! Once enough time is focused in a more constructive place than the depths of someone’s Instagram page a feeling of relaxation arises. There will always be time to be engrossed in social media but I hope more than anything that young people can learn to stay present in the more simple joys of life.

When having a conversation, I try to remind myself to continuously look someone in the eye and ask questions about what they are saying. That is the best way to show your true interest in another person. It is just too easy to get lost behind a screen when the world is going by around us. We walk around engrossed in the latest Tasty video or Snapchat story, completely oblivious to the beauty passing by with every step.

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Giphy.com

It may seem impossible to go a full day without your phone but the experience will allow you to see the world a little differently. You don’t need that perfectly staged Snapchat video or Instagram story to show that you are having fun with your friends. There is definitely pressure in our world today about posting constantly to ensure that your followers know you are maintaining an interesting life. Your friends that you are hanging out with already know how much fun you are. Pictures and videos are great, but soaking in the memories with your eyes and ears is more organic and fulfilling.

It is always great to snap some pics of a new place or some cool food, but save the editing and posting until after in order to enjoy the rest of the day. People always seemed surprised when I say I left my phone at home for the day or night; it’s like a security blanket that is thought to be a necessity when I can function just as well without it.

Right now you are looking at a screen, as are billions of people around the world. Try taking a breather from all the screens and pay attention to the beautiful details all around you because the world is a lot more interesting than the Instagram popular page.

I snapped this pic before embarking on a beautiful walk down the beach a few weeks ago. Left my phone in the car (:

 

What Sophomore Year Has Taught Me

College is quite a wild ride. I never expected to learn, change, and grow as much as I did. Sometimes, I feel like a completely different person. Other times, I feel merely like a more mature version of my high school self. Regardless of the impact college has left on you thus far, it’s inevitable that its going to teach you a few important lessons: some in the classroom and some in the broader sense of life.

Friendships are hard to maintain, but so valuable.

What everyone always told me about college is true: you do meet people who completely change your life, for the better. One of the absolute best parts about Emerson for me so far is the opportunities I’ve gotten to befriend some extraordinary people. It’s so rare to meet people who make you feel loved, supported, and cherished, but that’s what Emerson has done for me. However, I’ve also learned that friendships are hard. It’s easy to call someone your friend when you cross paths with them every day during the semester and can easily meet up at the DH after class or run down two flights of stairs to their room in LB. But, as soon as it hits summer, it honestly gets so difficult to see a lot of those people you still call “friends.” When you have to really go out of your way to make plans and schedule times to meet up with someone off-campus, those friendships might face a four-month hiatus. It’s disappointing, but I think it really proves to you, deep down, who your best friends really are. They are the people who you genuinely want to see and with whom it’s never a hassle to make plans. They’re the gems that college has given you.

Never take family for granted.

Family can mean something different for everyone. It’s not just the conventional family that we all expect; families can come from friends and organizations, too. Regardless of who it is you call “family,” college has taught me that those are so rare and meaningful. Family is the people who you know will support and love you unconditionally. And, as a college student when life is turned upside down often, it’s nice to have something like that. As most other high school people at that time, I hated being at home during high school. I was constantly out of the house and rolling my eyes about my parents. Now, I often can’t wait to go home and just lay around the house with my parents and sister, reliving old memories and laughing about things only we’d understand. Having a constant in my life has been such a breath of fresh air in the swirling vortex that can be Emerson. I’ve come to appreciate my rich culture and the caring parents who raised me in it. I feel wiser, stronger, and more independent because of my family.

Putting yourself out there is everything.

My first semester of college was, to be brief, a tragic mess. I, someone who was a social butterfly my entire life, finally felt like my wings had been clipped off. Starting fresh in a completely different environment was a major stress on my life. I didn’t know how to make new best friends when I’d known my best friends from home since the sixth grade. It wasn’t like I was holed up in my room alone every night; I just only really spent time with my roommates and went home every other weekend. I owed that solitude to the fact that all I did was go to class and come back to my enclosed dorm. I wasn’t a part of any organizations and didn’t have any opportunities to make friends. That simple idea of not putting myself out there by joining any new organizations and clubs almost led me to transferring from Emerson. However, second semester rolled around, and I got accepted into Emerson Noteworthy, an a cappella group. Finally having a group of people outside of class to see regularly and be myself around changed everything for me. Because that’s all it took: having an outlet where I could do something I was passionate about and also have people with whom to share it. That slowly led me to opening myself up more. And here I am now, a member of 6 different organizations and thriving (in most ways).

Nothing is certain, and that’s something you just have to embrace.

It’s really terrifying looking into the future and having absolutely no idea what it holds. That future for most college students is in the post-grad life; for me, it also includes the next two years of my life at Emerson. Since coming here, I’ve changed my major, made and lost friends, and had so many of my perspectives on life questioned and completely flipped around. I thought that I was going to graduate with a degree in Journalism to go on and pursue a career at a news station as an anchor. Now, I’m working towards a degree in Marketing Communications, hoping to someday be on a marketing team for one of my favorite brands (maybe even a CMO someday, or at least that’s the ultimate dream). I’ve had some best friends come and go with semesters and others remain permanently rooted in my life. I came into college extremely skeptical and uninterested in Fraternity and Sorority Life, and I am now a proud member of Zeta Phi Eta. It’s truly impossible to predict your every move in college. As you shift and grow, your likes, dislikes, beliefs, and opinions will shift and grow, too. I used to be the kind of person who needed to know exactly what was happening, when it was happening, and where it was happening. While I’m still like that at times, I’m learning to recognize that there are just some things that cannot be controlled. And while it can be disappointing and heartbreaking to lose people who meant the world to you once and have your entire future plans halted and turned on their heads, it’s also exciting. It’s thrilling that life can take so many twists and turns and that every decision can lead to a million wonderful things you never expected. Life is so moldable, and that’s quite beautiful (especially for an arts student).

So, regardless of if you absolutely love college or if you’re dying to get that diploma, it’s obvious that where you go to college, the classes you take, and the people you meet can have a huge impact on your life. It has an eerie mystery to it, yet that mystery holds so many unseen opportunities. It teaches you to exemplify your strengths and improve your weaknesses, making you a stronger and wiser human being. In the end, college is a brief time in your life, but it’s a special time that can really influence your path in the future.

Japan: My Perspective

I have never been to Japan.

I know, I bet you have not been there either. However, there is a reason why that sentence is so important: I am half Japanese and have never been to the country that half of my body, my soul, my literal blood belongs to. Going to Japan is almost like a milestone in my family – if you go, you are a true member of the family. And as of April 10th, I am officially going to Japan this summer from August 17th to September 3rd.

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Commuting From Home

After going through a life-long search to find the perfect house for my family, I knew that there was no way in hell I would be able to live in apartment that I could pay for myself until I was a functioning adult. Most of this sentiment comes in part by the reality of getting zero assistance from my parents to pay for an apartment and the other fees that come with this responsibility. And since the cheapest apartment I have ever come across that is close by to campus costs $900 a month, I have decided to live at home for my junior year of college. I know, I know, I think I might have lost my mind but at the same time, I have no problem being a scammer.

For the most part, I am a home-body. I like the comfort of having a home or at least little pieces of comfort that remind me of home. And I have made myself quite the home here at Emerson but I am looking forward to having real food, free laundry, and a couch that I can lay on without disrupting someone else’s personal space. If it was up to me, I would gladly live on campus next year but that’s not possible as the junior lottery is a fake scam in itself and there’s not enough space for everyone.

What I noticed the most about making the decision to live at home is that I get a plethora of reactions from those I mention it to or those who ask about my living situation for next year. Overall, people tend to respect my decision but I have gotten a lot of confused facial expressions, some form of amusement, and a lot of questions. And for the purpose of this post, I have decided to share these quirky questions and give you my equally quirky but honest answers.

Continue reading “Commuting From Home”

Decision Making: Tips and Techniques to Improve Your Form

To some people, I may seem decisive. To others, they’ve probably never seen me set down a firm decision. Always yielding to the people around me, whether it be the cuisine for a dinner out with friends or a subject matter I didn’t know much about or have experience with. I wasn’t born decisive. And quite frankly, I don’t think anyone was. Either way, I’ve learned some things through the many decisions I have and have not made.

First off, not every right decision will lead to happiness. At least, not immediately. That must be accepted first and foremost. If you think the right answer and happiness are synonymous, you might have been making the wrong decision all along. Take breakups for example, I doubt they’re easy for either partner, but the decision was made probably for the better. Your heart will catch up to your decision, just not instantaneously.

Something else I’ve learned is that information will always be the North Star in the decision making process. Even if it’s an emotional decision, it’s grounding to have some sort of fact to connect your brain to whatever is going on in your heart. The hormonal and the logical will balance out when the right decision is made.

I want to clarify that being indecisive does not mean not having a backbone, and vice versa. But it also can be said, that you can have or be without both. This one, I do not have personal experience with. However, I have watched other’s struggle with indecisiveness and kindness to the point of fault.

Surviving in this world is simple: food, water, air, and sleep. Thriving in this world and being happy requires more. You can’t yield to everyone or everything. Being nice does not mean falling for what others say. Being nice does not mean someone’s problems are worse. Being nice does not mean letting yourself be unhappy because someone else needs you more. Being nice means treating people with respect; the same respect you want to be treated with. Being nice is taking an interest and asking the questions you want to be asked. Being nice is standing by a friend; a friend who is just as nice to you.

Just as there are people who are nice to a fault, there are people who are opportunistic to a fault. Or in a less euphemistic way, bratty personalities; spoiled characters that require the attention. These are the people who lead decisions and take advantage of those without the spine. And these you should be wary of.

If you’re saying or thinking false justification lines like “It’s only for right now, it will pass,” until it happens again or “they just don’t fully understand,” although you’ve explained it time and time again in various different forms and volumes. Then you’re in denial and you know you’re in denial. Imagine this article as your best friend slapping you awake. These lines are tiresome and old and it’s time to change your game.

If you’re in an intimate relationship with this person, please make decisions about what you want. Make the decision for you, not for anyone else. The decision for you is what leads to happiness. If you’re in a platonic relationship with this person, remember that any person can be kept at any length and you hold the key to the power of you. Listen to your heart, listen to your brain, and find the right decision for you, then happiness will follow.

I don’t think I can say the following statement enough, but being nice or indecisive or both does not lower your IQ. Even if you’ve never studied any subject in your life, you are an expert in yourself. Don’t let someone take advantage of you, whether it be what to eat for dinner or whether to stay in the relationship.

When Life Doesn’t Go The Way You Planned

College is a very strange, unique time in our lives. Our fate has yet to be decided, and as a result, many parts of our lives feel constantly left up to chance. What we imagine ourselves doing in ten years is probably not what we will actually end up doing. So how can one stay sane with such a small sense of control? How can we plan blindly for an ever changing future?

Psych! You thought I was going to tell you. Unfortunately, nobody knows the answer. We’re all just fumbling in the dark as best we can. Honestly, if I tried to tell you what to do, I would probably be wrong. So instead of giving you a list of steps to follow or a surefire plan of action, I’ll tell you what has been working for me and, at the very least, it may lend you some perspective.

Here are my words of advice based off of my personal experiences as of late.

It’s essential to remember that the attitude you feel toward yourself is entirely up to you. No matter what anyone tells you, your personal fate lies entirely in your hands. Of course, it is always wise (and often necessary) to go to others for help. Acknowledging that, it’s wiser still to remember that you can’t lean on others to make up the foundation of your basic self. It’s up to you to stand firmly in what is healthiest for you—becoming too dependent on others can quickly become unhealthy for all involved.

No one can guarantee happiness or success to you—so often I compare myself to others and expect more of myself than is realistic. We have everything within ourselves to be happy—it just takes time, effort (and sometimes psychiatric help). I’m talking about self love here, people. College is full of situations that test what little faith we have in ourselves, and often exposes how vulnerable we are.

One big, ugly problem that almost any Emersonian can relate to is housing selection. No matter how much you try, there’s no promising that it will go your way. My first experience with housing was a complete nightmare. My group of four did not get suite selection, and upon being cast into the stormy seas of open housing, fractured and broke apart. The anxiety of not knowing where or how I would be living next year left a constant, gnawing fear in the back of my mind.

In order to cope with all that terrifying uncertainty, I find it extremely helpful to acknowledge the concept of entropy: the guaranteed decline of all things towards disorder. Without a force of energy keeping things in order, all things will spiral into chaos. That seems like it would be the opposite of comforting, but it’s actually the best thing physics can do for us. It gives us the opportunity to have some control over our lives—a way to influence positive change on whatever messed up situation we are currently in. If we dedicate time towards something we love and care about, that thing will prosper.

College is full of surprises. If your year has been anything like mine, you’ve had a wild ride. A lot of things I thought were going to pan out turned out to be a bust, but on the other hand, a lot of good things have also come out of what were once broken. I’ve realized that there’s absolutely no sense in wasting time worrying about issues that are out of my control, like housing, course selection and countless other things that plague us college students. For those things, we must embrace the unknown and remain firm in the knowledge that the universe will work it out in its own time. If we focus on what we can change instead—like our level of self love—we can turn our fear into a force of positive energy.

Though we can’t all become carefree rays of sunshine, we can make a conscious effort to improve our lives. So here’s what we’ve learned this year: if you do nothing to influence change, things will never get better. But, if you are willing to work against the underlying chaos of our world, things can (and will) get better. Try starting with small things, like keeping your room clean. Once you are aware that the mess only grows the more you ignore it, you will find a purpose in keeping that mess at bay. This same principle can be applied to anything in life. It’s completely a matter of choice—and it’s all entirely, irrevocably up to you.

Sticking to What Works: Why We Find Things We Love, and Then Drop Them

I have recently become comfortable with the practice of yoga. For years, I watched beautiful people in a light sweat bounce casually out the door of the numerous yoga studios around town. As a child, I wondered about them‒what those rolled up mats were for, how they always seemed so calm and serene, why they all looked like hippies. As I grew older, I began to envy them. What was this strange practice that supposedly quieted the mind while simultaneously strengthening the body? I couldn’t understand how meditation could make someone sweat, let alone present a physical challenge.

Curious and interested in Eastern philosophy, I decided to see what all the fuss was about for myself. At first, things seemed hopeless. I was thin and bony, without an ounce of muscle on my body. My grandfather used to hold up my limp little arms and joke with me, saying, “Look at this sack of wet mice.” I couldn’t even lift ten pounds. As I crouched there on my purple yoga mat, praying the teacher wouldn’t come over and fix my position again, I stole glances at the other people in the class. To my surprise, no one else was looking around nervously like I was. They all had their eyes closed, earnestly breathing in rhythm like the good yogis they were.

At the time, I thought they were all masters. It seemed to come so easy to them, like they didn’t even have to try. I started to wonder what I was doing there, feeling like I had disturbed their meditation, distracting the teacher who kept coming over to pull my arms higher up by my ears or bend my knee deeper into a lunge. I thought to myself that I had been wrong to dream about yoga all this time, that it clearly was not for me.

A few years later, I came back to the practice with a fresh outlook. At my new studio, I realized that not one person in the room was a master. They were all struggling too, in their own personal way. I began to feel like for the first time in my life I had found a form of exercise that I could pursue confidently, without having to worry that I wasn’t good enough. Organized sports had always made me feel inferior‒I didn’t understand why I had been born with noodles for arms, lanky legs and flat feet. After trying just about every sports team in my town, I gave up and pursued the arts instead.

This is another interest into which I have dedicated a substantial amount of time. Though creative endeavors come much easier to me than any form of physical exercise, the pattern began to show up once again. This time, I noticed it in my writing. Since elementary school, I have loved poetry. I would collect pretty notebooks and write my most secret thoughts there, weaving them into rhymes as best I could. For years, I remained proud of my work‒I remained humble, but believed that I was writing something worthy of being read. In my junior year of high school, I went to a weekend conference for young writers. I studied poetry there and in that week wrote my best work to date. I met wonderful people who possessed more talent than I had ever seen. I wanted to be like them.

When I got home, I tried writing poetry again as I had for so many years before, but something had changed. I no longer had the confidence in my work to see it through more than one revision, often leaving poems unfinished, never to be looked at again. It was the saddest loss of interest I’ve ever experienced—the passion that had kept me up at night to write poems had gone suddenly, without my notice.

Back to my new found love for yoga. I bought all the necessary accouterments‒the special padded mat, new leggings, headbands, sports bras and tank tops. I was ready to be like those beautiful yoga people I had watched for so long and for a little while, I was. For a few weeks, I scheduled my life around classes, trying to go as often as I could. I looked forward to the rush of energy and bliss that washed over me as I left each session. It was a similar feeling to writing a poem that explains your feelings exactly as they are in your head.

Then, very subtly, something again began to change. I stopped looking forward to classes and started seeing them as I had seen all exercise in the past—something I had to drag myself to, monotonous and unenjoyable. As the weeks continued to roll by, I went to classes less and less, procrastinating with them like I would with school deadlines. After a while, I stopped going altogether.

As time went on, I realized that this was a trend in my life and that, after speaking to others about this phenomenon, I was not alone. Every time I found something constructive, a goal of some kind to work towards, I would pursue it for a while, then slowly lose interest. Yoga was such a healthy force in my life—it was challenging, fun and made me feel good. I had spent so much of my life feeling defeated by organized exercise and here I had finally found something that worked for me. So why did I stop? I’m still trying to figure it out. I could blame it on my generation as a whole and claim that as a millennial my attention span is naturally short. I could even say that those hobbies just weren’t for me. The thing is, I know full well that I loved doing them and wish I hadn’t let them slip out of habit.

If in reading this you’ve realized that you too are resisting things you are good at, things that you love—my advice to you (and myself) is to jump headfirst back into it. Drag yourself if you must, but don’t let yourself slip out of healthy habits. No matter how rational your excuses may sound in your head, I guarantee you’ll feel better knowing that you gave it your best college try. As I write this, I am resolving to go to yoga tomorrow. might even write a poem.

Movie Review: Entourage

Warning: Contains spoilers!

Entourage is a continuation of an HBO television series of the same name that ran from 2004 to 2011. It was released on June 3, 2015 and has grossed over $44 million. The protagonist, Vincent “Vince” Chase (Adrian Grenier) and his “entourage” of childhood friends, his brother Johnny “Drama” Chase (Kevin Dillion), agent Eric Murphy (Kevin Connolly), and personal chef Turtle (Jerry Ferrara)  grew up in a dangerous neighborhood. However, Vince was discovered by his agent-turned-producer, Ari Gold (Jeremy Piven) and they all ended up in Hollywood.

I had never heard of the television show, nor do I remember seeing any previews for the movie, so I went in completely blind. I actually went to the theater to see a different movie, but every other show was full for the next few hours (the only downside to those giant, fancy armchairs.)

Vince’s nine-day marriage ends and he decides he wants to do something different. Gold, who had just become a producer, offers Vince the lead in his first movie, Hyde, but Vince demands to direct as well. The movie skips ahead eight months, when Vince, who’s already over budget, needs another $10 million dollars. Gold is forced to visit the Texan rancher Larsen McCredle (Billy Bob Thornton) and his son, Travis McCredle (Haley Joel Osment), who are financing the movie. Larson is unconvinced of the movie’s worth and sends Travis to decide if they should give Gold and Vince the money they need.

The gang organizes a screening to get feedback on the movie and hundreds of people show up. Vince gets cold feet, fakes technical difficulties and gives Ari and Travis DVDs to watch themselves. Travis is thrilled, because he’s just met the model of his dreams, Emily Ratajkowski, and goes with off with her.

Gold decides that Hyde is amazing, but Travis doesn’t feel the same way. He first says he doesn’t like Johnny and then adds he hates Vince as well. The gang realizes that Travis only hates the movie because he’s jealous that Vince and Emily have started dating. Larson, surprised but also irritated at the disrespect he believes his son faced, agrees only to back the movie if Gold resigns, which Gold does.

Hyde goes on to be a major hit and makes over $450 million worldwide. Johnny, struggling through the entire movie with his poor career, wins an award for best supporting actor. In the last lines of the movie, a photographer ironically suggests to the gang that a movie be made of their lives.

Unfortunately, I wan’t very engaged while watching Entourage. The characters were more annoying than interesting, especially Travis and Johnny. The fact that the whole movie almost went under because Travis felt disrespected was slightly ridiculous, seeing as Emily didn’t want to go out with him in the first place. He forced her to let him go to her house and watch the movie with her and got angry that she was interested in someone else. He literally waited outside of her house after she finally got him to leave to see if Vince was going to show up. That’s creepy. That’s not okay. Emily is entitled to date whoever she wants.

That’s not the only hit against women in the movie. Most of the movie and the character’s subplots are based around the sexualization of women. The are countless party scenes of scantily-clad women and more than a couple sex scenes. Jeremy Pivon describes the movie as a “male fantasy,” but it’s pretty demeaning to women. The only functional relationship is between Gold and his wife.

Let’s look at Eric, who gets his ex-girlfriend, Sloan, pregnant. He cheated on her, with her mother, I think, which is why they broke up. Then he started sleeping with another pretty blonde with big boobs, but she dumps him because she thinks his relationship with Sloan makes it awkward for her. He sleeps with another girl that night and both girls have to confront him for acting like a womanizing jerk by scaring the hell out of him.

The characters may have come from nothing, but I couldn’t feel sympathy for their problems when they’re so conceited. The whole movie is a showcase of glitzy Hollywood life, and obviously celebrities have personal issues just like everyone else, but it was hard to care about the characters when I didn’t like them or their lifestyle.

Overall, they didn’t face any real problems or failures because every single thing worked out in the end. I don’t really understand how it could be a satire of Hollywood life, because there were no lessons learned and no making fun of Hollywood life. It wasn’t even funny. They started out great, used their connections and riches to solve their non-truly-existent problems and ended up even better without having to change any of their ways.

My Yoga Experience

I have probably struggled with anxiety my whole life. However, I mostly noticed it in high school. Between playing two varsity sports and focusing on my studies, there was so much work to do in so little time.

My average day started at 7:30 a.m. when I would go to school until classes ended at 3 p.m. Then, I would have field hockey or softball practice until 6 p.m. Considering I lived 30 to 45 minutes away from my high school, I wouldn’t get home until right before 7 o’clock at night. This basically meant that I would have to shower, eat dinner and do homework before I went to bed at a reasonable hour.

Yes, I know this schedule could have been a lot worse. I know that I could have gotten home a lot later or could have had longer practices, but for someone with anxiety, having less time can lead to the worst. Having a set timeline stresses me out. Yes, having everything planned out should probably help my anxiety, but I always feel like it’s a checklist, something to quickly get done, like a race. (And does not help that I am also extremely competitive.)

So how does this connect to yoga?

IT may seem like I am writing this solely to rant about my high school life, but I’m not. Yoga was something that meant so little during high school. I did not realize the true impact it could have made so early in my life. I always practiced yoga, but not seriously. I almost took it for granted. It was more for stretching and keeping me in shape. It wasn’t until college that I fully immersed myself into its culture and lifestyle.

With that immersion and new found love, I found a new life. Yoga can mean many different things depending on the person. To some, it is an excuse to wear high fashion workout clothing. To others, a way to get fit. But to many, an escape from the real world.

Photo Credit: Jacob Kleinman Phillips
Photo Credit: Jacob Kleinman Phillips

For me, yoga offers a sanctuary. A place that is forever and fully accepting of me, and that will support me no matter how much I change. It is amazing how having a place that fully accepts you for you, without any judgement, can affect a person. Whenever I feel anxiety creeping up or need to take a pause on life, yoga is there for me with open arms. The best part is that you know that it is always there for you because you have control over your own practice. If you are stressed out in the airport because your flight just got cancelled, all you have to do is find a spot to sit and then focus on yourself.

Photo Credit: Jacob Kleinman Phillips
Photo Credit: Jacob Kleinman Phillips

You only need a place that gives you the ability to center yourself and take a pause from the everyday bustling of life. This pause can be some sun salutations, meditation or just focusing on your breath. Personally, all of these ways have helped me to defend off anxiety, but each person has their own preference.

At the end of every practice at my studio in Philadelphia, my teacher tells us to honor the light within us and within others. When stating this, we bring our hands in the shape of a “v,” with our thumb knuckles pressed against our foreheads, and welcome in all positivity.

Within this saying, there are so many ways for interpretation. Most importantly, it reminds us to stay positive and to stop getting stressed over the little things. To realize what is the most important in our hearts and to honor it fully. Because of this mantra, and so many others that one learns by being a part of the yoga community, I have become a better person by heart. A better person for both myself and for others.

Take it from me, a life without anxiety is a much fuller and beautiful life to live by. With this being said, this article is not meant to convince you to practice yoga, but to find something, like I did, that helps you to reconnect with and love yourself again. We should all have some sort of practice, whether it be yoga or not, to live by that helps us to cut out of routine and focus on ourselves.

I found mine, so what is yours?

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