Making The Most of This Summer Without An Internship

Being at Emerson, it’s likely that you’re constantly surrounded by freshmen with more on their resumes than your parents. That’s just the way it is here, which means there can be a lot of pressure to build up your own portfolio through internships or other professional experiences. However, as we all know, starting out can get a little tricky—especially when you don’t get that call back from a position you really wanted. The truth of the matter is that sometimes things just don’t work out, but fear not. Even if you didn’t land the perfect internship position, there are still a lot of ways to stay productive this summer. Here are just a few ways that you can make the most of your four months off from school.

Freelance Work

I’m going to let you in on a secret: even though you haven’t graduated yet, your work is good. Whether you’re a writer, visual artist or filmmaker, just the fact that you’re pursuing an arts degree means that you’re skilled at your craft. Believe it or not, companies are always searching for people that can do little projects for them here and there with no strings attached. This means that you can make some pocket money from doing what you love, all while practicing your skills and getting real world experience. Content-based websites are constantly fielding pitches (like VinylMePlease.com or HelloGiggles.com, just to name a few) and if you have an idea about an article, email them! Alternatively, Joseph Gordon-Levitt has become notorious for inspiring young artists to collaborate on his platform HitRecord, a website that gives artists prompts and then eventually publishes the best works (meaning if you are chosen, a check is coming your way!) Just trust your talent, put yourself out there, and you’re bound to make something great for someone this summer.

A Summer Job

We all know college is expensive. We’ve all seen the memes about it and we’ve all cried to our friends and families about the ridiculousness of a 100 dollar textbook at least once. But what can you do about it? The obvious answer—the one that not even I like hearing—is to get a job. I know, this is only a temporary solution to the much larger issue of absurd tuition funds but it wouldn’t hurt to put a few extra bills in your wallet this summer from a part-time job. Besides, working retail can be fun sometimes if you find the right place and can also be a good resume builder if you’re looking to enter the customer service world at any point. Indeed.com can be a great place to find some local listings, so just log on, type in your zip code, and see what happens!

Build A Portfolio

Something I think that all Emersonians forget sometimes is that our art isn’t just our career outlet. At the end of the day, it makes us who we are, it relieves our stress and social anxieties, and it lets us exercise our creativity. So this summer, instead of selling your art, just think about making it (not for anyone but yourself.) If you’re a VMA, then make some short films that aren’t class assignments. WLPs, write some stories for yourself. Then, at the end of the summer, choose your favorite pieces, compile them together, and make yourself the awesome portfolio that you deserve. Make something that represents you as an artist, not as a professional, and hopefully that will be the distinguishing factor that can help you get the job next time.

Commuting From Home

After going through a life-long search to find the perfect house for my family, I knew that there was no way in hell I would be able to live in apartment that I could pay for myself until I was a functioning adult. Most of this sentiment comes in part by the reality of getting zero assistance from my parents to pay for an apartment and the other fees that come with this responsibility. And since the cheapest apartment I have ever come across that is close by to campus costs $900 a month, I have decided to live at home for my junior year of college. I know, I know, I think I might have lost my mind but at the same time, I have no problem being a scammer.

For the most part, I am a home-body. I like the comfort of having a home or at least little pieces of comfort that remind me of home. And I have made myself quite the home here at Emerson but I am looking forward to having real food, free laundry, and a couch that I can lay on without disrupting someone else’s personal space. If it was up to me, I would gladly live on campus next year but that’s not possible as the junior lottery is a fake scam in itself and there’s not enough space for everyone.

What I noticed the most about making the decision to live at home is that I get a plethora of reactions from those I mention it to or those who ask about my living situation for next year. Overall, people tend to respect my decision but I have gotten a lot of confused facial expressions, some form of amusement, and a lot of questions. And for the purpose of this post, I have decided to share these quirky questions and give you my equally quirky but honest answers.

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Inside Emerson’s New Dorm Building

This past year, there’s been plenty of talk about the construction happening on Emerson’s Boylston Street campus. From the building of a new dining hall to Little Building being closed for renovations starting this May, to a new dorm building with its entrance in the Boylston Place alleyway—change is definitely coming to Emerson. But, how much do Emerson’s students actually know about these construction projects? Particularly, how much do students know about this new dorm building? Many students will call 2 Boylston Place their home come next semester, and yet they might not know much about what the Boylston Place dorm will really be like.

As a student who is now a junior, even I’m a bit confused about just what is happening with this new dorm building, regardless if I might not have the opportunity to live there. Still, I’ve been watching this construction happen since I started at Emerson. The sounds of drilling and workers shouting over the noise of their equipment have become all too familiar to my peers and me.

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No Internship? No Problem!

You go to Emerson College, so odds are when you think of summer, you’re not thinking about lazy days spent relaxing at the beach or the memories you’ll make with family members and friends. Instead, you’re thinking about resume building: how can I get an internship this summer? And what happens if I don’t find one? That’s when the panic sets in. You’ll then find yourself staring at your laptop screen till all hours of the night, trying to perfect your resume and cover letter. Though it might be scary, I’m here to tell you that there is always something productive you can do with your time over summer break.

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Emerson Culture creates a Hectic Enviornment

Second semester at Emerson has started. The dorms are packed with students from all over the country–well mostly from Massachusetts, California, and for some reason New Jersey. There are a couple of new freshmen who wander the halls looking like lost pups, but the other freshmen have a whole semester under their belts and feel upgraded to pro status.

It seems that everyone is rushing from class to squeezing their Einstein bagels so hard that the cream cheese could pop out at any moment. Little do you know that before that class they already have had a club meeting, submitted a piece for a magazine, and had a shift at work. Emerson students are notoriously busy and it seems that an overbooked schedule has become the “norm.”

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Upcoming Changes to the Emerson Campus

If there is one thing Emerson students are accustomed to seeing, it’s scaffolding. I don’t remember a time that Emerson’s campus wasn’t dominated by rows of scaffolding that hang ominously above as you wait to cross at the Boylston-Tremont intersection. Scaffolding has been a fixture outside the Little Building (LB) for a long time now. This is to be expected, given it’s an old building desperately in need of some sprucing up. Thankfully, Emerson will begin the renovation process of LB next semester. Starting in January 2017, though, the lower-level of the building will be closed. This means that both the campus fitness center and the Cabaret (at least in their current locations) will be closed as well.

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Emerson Alumni: They Went Here?

Anyone who attends Emerson is probably well-accustomed to hearing about the different celebrity alumni that have walked the school’s hallowed halls (although Emerson has changed campus locations numerous times over the years). Yes, Emerson loves to talk about its Emerson Mafia. Of course, an impressive list of alumni is something for the college to be proud of. It’s nice to know, after all, that a good amount of people who have attended and graduated from Emerson have gone on to do incredible things.

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Registration is here!

It is November 7th and registration starts today as Election Day lingers in the distance. And luckily, Effie Trinket from the Hunger Games has something to tell you:

Credit: quickmeme.com
Credit: quickmeme.com

Yes, it has reached that time in the semester where we all have to attend academic advising or department advising meetings, figure out our pin numbers (for those of us who have them anyways), and to wake up bright and early at 7AM on our designated day! And in my case, I have a week to go until I will be able to register for my classes and as someone who surprisingly gets lucky with class registration, I want to provide you with some of my main tips.

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Eating & Crying My Way through Midterms

CREDIT: tumblr user remindmewhatiusedtolike
CREDIT: tumblr user remindmewhatiusedtolike

Midterms are here.

And at this moment in time, I am surprised to say that I do not feel extremely stressed out. Since my exams and projects are spread out through this month, I am anticipating my transformation into the peak definition of a hot mess by the time midterms are done and as finals loom in the distance. I suppose that is why I want more than ever to hide in my basement forty-five minutes away from campus and stay there until all of my academic responsibilities fly away. With this in mind, it is important to figure out the ways we can all destress and to have snippets of quality time where we are able to seek comfort and positivity. And for me, I am definitely one of those people who benefit from eating good food and crying.

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Pub Club’s Spring 2016 Book Launch

One of the perks of being a student at Emerson is all of the organizations there are to take part in. No matter your major or interests, there’s probably an organization where you can express your interest and hone your skills outside of a classroom setting.

Undergraduate Students for Publishing, more commonly known as Pub Club, is an organization that operates less like a college organization at times, and more like its own mini publishing house. Pub Club publishes two manuscripts per semester and each manuscript is written, edited, designed and marketed by Emerson students. At the end of the semester, when the books are published all proceeds from book purchases go to the charities of each author’s choosing.

As the spring semester comes to a close, Pub Club is ready to launch two more books for the Emerson community to buy and enjoy.

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Gay by May, written by David Carliner, is a funny and honest account of some of his life stories. True to the title, many of the stories are about Carliner navigating his love life and figuring out his sexual identity. The book also breaks up a lot of the personal essays with lists and tweets for a fun and quick read. Carliner’s novel can be reminiscent of many of the novels that have been written by comedians lately, since Carliner is a comedian himself and brings a lot of that humor to his book. Carliner has chosen True Colors Fund, a nonprofit organization that seeks to end homelessness among LGBT Youth, as the charity he wishes the proceeds to go to.

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These Thoughts That Hold Us, written by Sarah Cummings, is a collection of interconnected short stories that are woven together by the common theme of mental illness and what seems to hold people together when everything else is falling apart. Cummings connects the five narratives by having the characters appear in each other’s stories, no matter how small the role may be, to establish that mental illness can affect anyone and it’s all connected. Cummings has chosen that the proceeds from These Thoughts That Hold Us go to Active Minds, a nonprofit organization that helps raise awareness and provide a safe environment for students to discuss mental illness.

When asked about advice he would give to aspiring writers, Carliner says, “Write a lot – obviously quality is important, but quantity is too. The more you write, the more you can parse the good from the bad.” When asked the same question, Cummings says, “The most important advice I could give is don’t give up and don’t stop submitting your writing, even when you fail. Also, it’s okay if your story isn’t going in the direction you planned, and it’s okay to give up control and see where it takes you. It’s also okay if you find a story just isn’t working anymore. It sucks, but if you’re at a dead end, it’s okay to put a story away for a while. You’ll either eventually be drawn back to it or you’ll come up with something that works even better.”

Pub Club is holding the launch for these two novels on April 19th at 7 p.m. in the Bill Bordy theater. The launch will also feature the 9th issue of Generic, which is Emerson’s only genre fiction literary magazine. The launch will have copies for sale of both books, and both authors will be answering questions as well as reading excerpts from their books.